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Re: Should TolkienGuide track completed eBay auctions?

Subject: Re: Should TolkienGuide track completed eBay auctions?
by Parmastahir on 2006/6/8 16:14:16

Speaking only from my experience picking up Tolkien calendars on eBay: I'm not certain how good a guide to prices it would be. Some bidders get caught up in the auction and pay more than an item should go for (and I have been on both the winning and losing side of such auctions!) So finding a high price and expecting your item to sell for the same is sometimes not realistic. Conversely, an item might sell for a somewhat (or even drastically) lower price than might be expected. This can occur on an eBay auction for which there is no reserve or a low starting bid yet a limited interest (few collectors). In which case, would you list an item for much less than you "know" it's worth? I have heard from eBay sellers that it is MUCH better to be on the selling side rather than the buying side because of the auction frenzy. So how valuable are those prices when it comes to selling (not auctioning) an item?

And then there is the ebb and flow of interest in collectibles. If I were to sell some of the calendars that I have acquired over the years, I doubt that I would recoup the cost of some (generally uncommon or true rarities) that I acquired at the height of the Tolkien craze created by the movies. So a "Guide to eBay prices" would seem to me to be of limited use as prices can fluctuate wildly in a year or two. For true rarities (as I think you may be limiting your database to), the values may remain useful for some time (the caveats above notwithstanding).

You may disagree, but an item is worth only what someone is willing to pay for it. And the best way to determine that is a simple negotiation between buyer and seller.

OK, I have rambled on long enough.

Away from the Green Hill Country,

Parmastahir