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Re: Signed 1968 UK Paperback LOTR
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We have seen many examples of these paperbacks... they all are very similar. These signed books all went to personal of Allen & Unwin and very close relatives. So I don't see it as some kind of booksigning event, more as a big thank you to the company that published his books (and had sooo much patience with him).

Posted on: 2011/1/2 3:30


Signed 1968 UK Paperback LOTR
Shirrif
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3 October 1968 Martin Blackman, Allen & Unwin home trade manager, brings to the Hotel Miramar at about 11.00 a.m. one hundred copies of the paperback Lord of the Rings for Tolkien to sign.

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide - Chronology (page 733) by Christina Scull & Wayne G. Hammond


I was always under the impression that Tolkien did not do any book signings like modern authors but thanks to Wayne & Christina I now know that he did at least one.

Does anyone know anymore about these books and the use that they were put to by GA&U? I have heard that they were given to staff.

Posted on: 2011/1/2 3:06


Re: Your bookshelf
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If you don't have enough shelf-space, you can always try this US dealer's innovative approach.

Open in new window


I found some more pictures of this bookstore (The Derby Square Bookstore, Salem MA) and an interesting quote

Last place you would want to be in an Earthquake


http://www.flickr.com/photos/reallyst ... 99652917/with/1097283976/ (last half of the pictures)

Posted on: 2011/1/2 2:30

(edited)


Re: Super Deluxe values
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A great discussion
Alpingloin said 'My general view of market value is very simple. Something is worth exactly what someone is willing to pay at a given time and place'.

This will remain the comment for me although all others before are neither wrong nor right. With auctions of course you generally take a gamble and with ebay this can indeed be madness but I do find this as thrilling to watch as actually going to an auction itself of which I have attended many.

I feel a lot does revolve around expectations of both the seller and buyer and naturally these do not always align or even be close. For example how many times have you seen a Tolkien item listed at what seems a very high price on ebay. Then in the text they state something like ' these are selling on Abe for XYZ'. Rubbish- they are not selling but are being advertised and are likely to not even achieve anywhere near the high price asked.

A factor that self fuels this behaviour is in my mind the exceptional sales that we all sometimes see and hear about. These often seem to give sellers a 'dream' that they will achieve these 'high' figures and thus they go for it. I am not saying this is wrong and if you have the money and time to wait/hope/pray for that buyer who wants item tomorrow then why not.

How I look at it is that if we didn’t have all these variables/methods of selling and our own individual thoughts then matching items would be all be a very similar price and you wouldnt see the huge differences in the market.

What I like about books is they are not all the same and no doubt lots of us hunt out that perfect Silmarillion or one signed by Christopher. Would I pay extra for that copy - Yes of course but how much? Answers on a postcard too .........

Posted on: 2011/1/2 1:58


Re: Super Deluxe values
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Nice, Khamul! You are very right in pointing out something that I often overlook - the fact that an auction has to be driven by more than one person. This definitely falls into the supply and demand realm. Predicting demand can be quite tough. And, what you would really need to predict is how many serious buyers are out there who are willing to pay serious prices. The vast majority of people on ebay are bargain hunters not willing to pay high (or even fair) prices. So, how would a seller possibly gauge demand?

This is very interesting to me, first because I really only use ebay to sell, but also because I like to track things like number of page views, number of watchers, and number of unique bidders. Maybe there's a nice formula for determining which selling method is most effective using projected number of page views/watchers/unique bidders, maybe even factoring in how quickly an item attracts watchers and how many early bidders there are. Being limited to only my own ebay selling details (watchers, etc.), trying to do any sort of valid market research isn't going to happen. I'll probably stick to gut feelings. However, I am sure there is some line where one selling method becomes lower risk and produces better average results.

Anyway, I like using ebay to gauge values because it is a pretty active marketplace, with many transactions to observe. For example, there are enough sales of early edition Lord of the Rings sets of varied condition, presentation, auction style, etc., to get a good glimpse at what people (on ebay) are paying.

Finally, after writing this post, I am realizing a couple of reasons why we don't exactly see eye to eye. I got into this discussion when mention of my ebay auction was made and I think I am stuck in ebay seller mentality. I guess I tend to think of value as being what I can sell something for (again, with focus on ebay), not what I am willing to pay, or even what others have been paying. I recently sold a nice condition (no jacket) 1946 A&U Hobbit that I thought was worth around $700 for only $450. After selling fees, I probably ended up with less than $400 in my account. So, while others list this book for $800 to $1000, in the end, to me it was worth $400. Kind of sucks, because I'd probably pay that to get it back! On the other side, there have been (and probably will be again) times when I have paid a premium price, knowing that I could never get my money back if I tried to sell on ebay, but just had to have an item, or needed it to complete a set. So, as a buyer and collector valuing my collection, I really do agree with you.

Posted on: 2011/1/1 17:05



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