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First Impression GA&U Return of the King
Shirrif
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Inspired by garm's comment on a copy of "The Return of the King",

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Return-of-the-K ... 87ff&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

and its mention of priority on printing errors, I was interested in this copy and its mention of the variants on the text on page 281, which is described on Neil Holford's website

http://www.tolkienbooks.net/html/1st-rotk.htm

"Variants of the text on page 281
There is another area of damaged text on the last line of page 281. There are two states, priority as follows:

1. There is a gap in the middle of the word Me n.
2. The gap has been closed - Men.

The small scale survey by Steven M. Frisby found 4 out of 10 copies checked had the defective text."

The priority for the error on page 49 has been established as

"Variants of the text on page 49
The next set of variants concern the text on page 49. Priority as follows:

1. Undamaged text. No signature mark '4'.
2. Damaged text. No signature mark '4'.
3. Damaged text. Signature mark '4' present."

and the copy on Ebay has state 3 on page 49 and state 1 on page 281, my copy has state 1 on page 49 and state 2 on page 281, which leads me to question the priorities for page 281 and that should it be

"Variants of the text on page 281
There is another area of damaged text on the last line of page 281. There are two states, priority as follows:

1. The gap has been closed - Men.
2. There is a gap in the middle of the word Me n."

On looking at my Second Impression ROTK, page 281 is state 1.

This could have occurred because the priorities for page 49 were orginally thought to have been state 3 first, in which case page 281 would have a matching gap in Me n.

What do you think? Does anyone have a copy with state 1 of page 49 and a gap in Me n on page 281?

Andrew

Posted on: 2009/9/24 22:56


Re: The wonders of eBay
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Take a look here:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Return-of-the-K ... 87ff&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

- particularly at the 'provenance'. Apart from the iffy connection (if any) between Tolkien and this 'Rathbone', - Tolkien is said to have had dealings with Trinity college, and also Hilary college. Since when has there been a Hilary college at Oxford?

Obviously the vendor has mistaken the names of two of Oxford's terms (Michaelmas; Hilary; Trinity) for the names of colleges. It just happens to be a coincidence that there's also a college called Trinity.

But, this whole piece is bunk! And possibly meant to deceive? What do others think?

Posted on: 2009/9/24 14:53


Re: Tolkien the spy?
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If you are interested in this area, then I recommend "Enigma" by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore, who had a special interest in Bletchley Park as it was his families ancestral home.

A good book, we referred to it when writing our post. Also on our shelves is Seizing the Enigma by David Kahn (1991).

Wayne and Christina

Posted on: 2009/9/24 5:05


Re: Tolkien the spy?
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Findegil wrote:
The Royal Navy did not exactly use the secret German traffic "to intercept and destroy Hitler's U-Boats", as doing so would have given away the fact that Enigma was not impenetrable.


Did Bletchley Park use the deciphered traffic "to intercept and destroy Hitler's U-Boats"?

On the whole no, they used it primarily to make sure that convoys went around the areas where the U-Boats were waiting.

Later in the in the war the information from Bletchley Park was shared with the US and both the Royal Navy and US Navy sank all the German refueling vessels for U-Boats.

The Germans never believed that the ciphers had been broken, but that copies of the codebooks had been obtained and every time they got suspicious they changed the codes that were used.

If you are interested in this area, then I recommend "Enigma" by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore, who had a special interest in Bletchley Park as it was his families ancestral home.

Andrew

Posted on: 2009/9/20 22:12


Re: Tolkien the spy?
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Well, we can't expect reporters to actually do research on their subject, can we, W&C? ;)

With an article like this, it's impossible to know if the historian actually gave out this information, or was misunderstood and misquoted by the reporter. Perhaps both!

Readers here who don't also follow the Mythopoeic Society list may be interested in our answer to a question raised by the article: Did Tolkien in fact turn down the cryptography job, or was it that Tolkien wasn't needed for it? We wrote:

The latter seems to be the case -- that is, not yet needed -- according to Carpenter's note in Letters (p. 436), presumably based on materials in Tolkien's private papers (to which we ourselves did not have access), and this is supported by comments Tolkien made in letters to Allen & Unwin on 15 September and 19 December 1939. For some months after the training course in March that year -- we call it a "training course" in our Chronology (p. 226), Carpenter calls it a "course of instruction", the Telegraph article calls it a "tester", presumably it was all an aptitude test of some sort -- Tolkien assumed that he could be called into service by the Foreign Office at any time. He wrote as much to Philip Unwin on 15 September (we passed over the particular remark in our Chronology summary), to the effect that he had agreed to the job in the spring, was not yet summoned to it, but it was an open obligation -- Britain was now at war -- and once he was engaged with it, he did not know how much time it would allow him to devote to outside work. Then on 19 December he wrote to Stanley Unwin (see Letters, p. 44) that he was "uncommandeered still myself, and shall now probably remain so, as there is (as yet) far too much to do here [in the Oxford English School], and I have lost both my chief assistant and his understudy". In the same letter, Tolkien comments on his accident "just before the outbreak of war", on his wife's illness, and that he was now the virtual head of his department, all of which would have been good reasons for the Foreign Office not to call him to work in cryptography at that time -- assuming that he was suited to that work in the first place. His words, at least, give no indication that he turned down a position, but rather that it was a case of what Carpenter says in his note, that Tolkien was informed that "his services would not be required for the present".

The Telegraph article, which followed on a similar one on the This Is Gloucestershire website a day earlier, is frankly a mess. Even had Tolkien gone to work in cryptography, he would not have been a "spy" as the headline has it. Nor was he necessarily "'earmarked' to crack Nazi codes" -- some of the personnel at Bletchley Park were there as language, not cipher, specialists. Its staff were already, before 1939, reading messages enciphered on Enigmas -- the commercial variety if not the more difficult German army and navy Enigmas. The Royal Navy did not exactly use the secret German traffic "to intercept and destroy Hitler's U-Boats", as doing so would have given away the fact that Enigma was not impenetrable. The Lord of the Rings is not, of course, a trilogy -- and we could go on. We agree with our friend Aelfwine, on the Tolkien Collector's Guide website a few days ago, that the notation "keen" beside Tolkien's name on one of the official papers very likely refers to the pronunciation of Tolkien's surname, as opposed to "kine". Tolkien's connection with this part of the war effort was not "revealed for the first time" in the GCHQ exhibition, since it was mentioned in Letters and our Companion and Guide. The GCHQ historian makes the unwarranted assumption that Tolkien "failed to join" because "he wanted to concentrate on his writing career", and the rather silly remark that "perhaps it was because we declared war on Germany and not Mordor"; and then the reporter carries on in the same vein, with statements such as "the director of GCCS, known only as 'Alastair G. Denniston'", as if Alastair Denniston were an unknown figure, when in fact he is well known in the history of British cryptanalysis.

Wayne and Christina

Posted on: 2009/9/20 18:17



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