Login

Or
Register Now


Already have an account?
Username:

Password:

Remember me

Lost Your Password?
Main Menu
Collector's Guide Table of Contents
Recent Visitors

Stu
30 minutes ago

Jlong
2 hours 31 minutes ago

Karl
4 hours 5 minutes ago

laurel
6 hours 58 minutes ago

Findegil
8 hours ago

wellinghall
9 hours 26 minutes ago

Glorfindel
10 hours 20 minutes ago

Beren
10 hours 28 minutes ago
   All Posts (Findegil)


« 1 ... 26 27 28 (29) 30 31 32 ... 36 »


Re: Another Tolkien eBay Letter
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 188
Offline
Like the "Higgins" letters and the one supposedly to Walter Hooper, we strongly doubt the authenticity of the one to "Chris". It does indeed have the same paper, signature, and so forth we've seen before. Just as the "Hooper" letter takes off from the published letter to Hooper of 22 November 1966 (Letters, p. 371), repeating or adapting certain key words, so the "Chris" letter proceeds from Tolkien's letter to Joy Hill of 12 December 1966 (also Letters, p. 371, immediately following the one to Hooper!): "impertinent" > "impertinence", "claim property in inventing proper names" > "claim legal sway over the invention of proper names", etc.

So, was this letter supposed to have been sent to Christopher Wiseman? or to Christopher Tolkien? In either case, it would not have been signed "J.R.R. Tolkien". Are we to believe that Tolkien, on 11 December (if we read the date correctly), sent "Chris" a copy of the papers from the "young ass", and then on the 12th sent the originals to Allen & Unwin with his letter to Joy Hill? (The enclosures consisted of a sketch of the plot and three sample chapters, plus a covering letter: see Chronology, p. 682.)

Also, the reproduction of the "Chris" letter is clear enough to compare its typewriter face against that of Tolkien letters in our files only a day apart, and it's obviously a different machine in use.

As for the Unwin Books Hobbit being offered by the same seller, it seems to us that the second (non-printed) signature was written as carefully as possible to match the printed signature, and therefore not by Tolkien himself. We have on our shelves an Unwin Books Hobbit (first printing) with an unquestionably genuine Tolkien signature under the printed one, and there are differences between the two such as naturally occur from signature to signature. Our copy had been autographed for Rayner Unwin, who gave it to us as a wedding present in 1994 with a note from Rayner laid in: "The book you know: the second signature is not a printing error -- or forgery!"

Wayne and Christina

Posted on: 2009/11/21 13:40


Re: 1991 HarperCollins Hardback Slipcase Lord of the Rings
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 188
Offline
Our set is also 11.2 cm wide. It was bought in London, and Christina assumes that she got it as soon as it reached the shops.

Do both variants give the printing location as Glasgow, as ours does? Do both have the GBP14.99 price on the jacket flaps? Was the wider variant perhaps made for an overseas market, or for a book club edition, and separately printed? It seems less likely that HarperCollins would change the dimensions of binding cases and slipcase partway through the run, and more likely that the variants represent separate manufactures.

I'm wondering what caused the 0.7 cm difference in width. Thicker paper? Thicker boards?

Wayne

Posted on: 2009/11/9 5:29


Re: Festival in the Shire (August 2010)
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 188
Offline
Is that likely, do we suppose?

Given the cost of transatlantic travel, on top of the conference/festival/exposition cost, accommodations, etc., no, not likely.

Wayne & Christina

Posted on: 2009/11/3 6:02


Re: Tolkien Signatures on eBay???
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 188
Offline
Jlong and Mithrennaith's comments about the signed copy of The Last Battle are well taken. It is indeed very unlikely that Tolkien would sign one of the Narnia books, that the same copy would also be signed by Lewis, etc. Priscilla Tolkien took up a job in Bristol in 1952, but by 1958 had left there and was attending the London School of Economics, so it's no use bringing her into the question. And yes, there's that blue ink again.

We too have significant doubts about the "Higgins" letters. We've seen no evidence of Higgins, as Tolkien's doctor, friend, or otherwise, outside of the letters offered on eBay. The particular embossed Sandfield Road letterhead appears in none of the letters we've seen from that address -- that is, the address is correct, but the stamp is wholly different in its typeface and arrangement of lines -- or in any letters other than the "Higgins" letters seen online. The fact that the same stamp is used on a "Higgins" letter which refers to Edith Tolkien's death, long after Tolkien had moved from Sandfield Road, is curious, to say the least, and not convincingly explained away as leftover stationery since Tolkien typically struck through addresses when writing from another location, and at the time of Edith's death he had printed letterheads available. The style of typewriting (position, spacing, arrangement and breaks of lines) isn't characteristic of Tolkien, and in general nothing about the "Higgins" items reflects the sense of style and balance Tolkien typically brought to his typed letters. Nor did he tend to leave off dates. The signatures may look good -- with these too, though, we have our doubts -- but the rest doesn't hold together.

Laurel's comments about the provenance badly explained by the seller, and about the supposed letter to Walter Hooper, inspired us to look at the seller's other items being offered on eBay, and a very interesting selection it is. An "abstract watercolour . . . signed Francis Bacon": yes, it's signed "Francis Bacon", but is it by the well-known painter by that name, for whom an original watercolour priced at $295 for Buy It Now would be a serious bargain? The description doesn't say so in definite terms. What about a "double sided oil on canvas . . . signed Roger Fry"? An "abstract oil . . . signed Pollock"? Two ink and watercolour works "signed Aubrey Beardsley" (that is, the legend AUBREY BEARDSLEY is written in ink on a label on the back of the frame)? A letter from the King of Samoa (which could well be genuine in itself) "owned by Robert Louis Stevenson" (the only evidence for which seems to be a separate typewritten note reading FROM THE PRIVATE COLLECTION OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON)? And it goes on.

Wayne and Christina

Posted on: 2009/11/1 20:54


Re: Tolkien the spy?
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 188
Offline
If you are interested in this area, then I recommend "Enigma" by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore, who had a special interest in Bletchley Park as it was his families ancestral home.

A good book, we referred to it when writing our post. Also on our shelves is Seizing the Enigma by David Kahn (1991).

Wayne and Christina

Posted on: 2009/9/24 5:05



 Top
« 1 ... 26 27 28 (29) 30 31 32 ... 36 »