Login

Or
Register Now


Already have an account?
Username:

Password:

Remember me

Lost Your Password?
Main Menu
Collector's Guide Table of Contents
Recent Visitors

Urulöké
1 hour 44 minutes ago

Trotter
1 hour 54 minutes ago

wellinghall
2 hours 5 minutes ago

tolkienbrasil
2 hours 48 minutes ago

Karl
3 hours 31 minutes ago

ohypmzn86
6 hours 7 minutes ago

pD2gH1cG0x
7 hours 46 minutes ago

Turambar
12 hours 18 minutes ago
   All Posts (Findegil)


« 1 ... 29 30 31 (32) 33 34 »


Re: Tolkien Dedication
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 180
Offline
It looks okay to me too.

Wayne

Posted on: 2008/10/21 4:03
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull reading
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 180
Offline
We had eleven people in the audience, besides the two who own the bookshop. Not many, but appreciative. Christina read part of the Chronology section of our Companion and Guide on Tolkien's trip to Venice and Assisi, and part of the Reader's Guide entry on Environment, while I did the introductions and read the Popularity subsection of the Reader's Guide entry on The Lord of the Rings.

Wayne

Posted on: 2008/10/12 6:26
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Books from Tolkien's Personal Library??
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 180
Offline
The "[JRRT]" doesn't strike me as either Tolkien's or Christopher's handwriting. The letterforms don't seem quite right. It could easily be, and probably is, just something inserted by a bookseller. (You're right, Stu, it could have been written by anybody.) Of course, dealers like to entice prospective buyers with suggestions that a book might have added value, e.g. initials by JRRT or CRT.

I'm reminded of when I bought a copy of Oxford Poetry 1915 (containing Tolkien's "Goblin Feet"). The seller originally claimed that it was signed by two of the contributors, Tolkien and Aldous Huxley -- very nice if so. But it had already been returned by a Huxley collector, who said that Huxley's name was not in his handwriting; so it was offered to me with the deal that if Tolkien's name wasn't his signature either, I could have the book at half price. I needed only one look at "J. Tolkein" to come to a conclusion. (And a closer look, even with a small sampling, shows that both "A.L. Huxley" and "J. Tolkein" are in the same hand.)

Wayne

Posted on: 2008/10/12 6:18
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Tolkien signature
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 180
Offline
Christina and I haven't had a reply from Bloomsbury. Trotter, were you able to go see them? I'm not sure whose responsibility this is: Bloomsbury are acting as agent for the seller, and eBay are only a conduit for Bloomsbury to attract bids. Let the buyer beware! Though a sale at auction of a forgery must reflect badly on the auctioneer, especially if there has been warning of possible fraud.

Wayne

Posted on: 2008/10/11 10:58
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: BOOK COLLECTING: Moving Your Collection!
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/5/21 19:36
Group:
Shirefolk
Fellowship
Posts: 180
Offline
Well done, Khamul. Your method was almost the same as we used at the library I work for, to move our collections into temporary quarters (10%) or offsite storage (90%). Since these are worth about $300 million, we had to take a lot of care, and for security's sake packed most of our stuff ourselves. All books that could fit into a standard record storage carton (aka banker's box, knock-up box) went that way, cushioned on all sides by bubblewrap and with more bubblewrap to fill gaps. We had enough boxes (hundreds of them) that we ordered custom-sized and -perforated bubblewrap so that we could avoid a lot of cutting. For the carton, we chose a heavy-duty archival type from the Hollinger Corp. -- the ordinary boxes from Staples or the like are too weak -- sealed it with duct tape, and marked a tracking code on the end. Books that wouldn't fit in the box were wrapped individually in heavy acid-free paper. We didn't move the boxes etc. ourselves, but had a specialist library mover to do the job, one with an extremely good reputation for taking care (which they did, much in contrast to a move of furniture we then contracted with an ordinary, local firm to do). Our rule too was not to stack cartons more than three high.

When Christina moved to the U.S. from London, she had almost no furniture but a lot of books (about 6,000 volumes), so it made sense to hire a professional book packer -- someone who provided the service to dealers at antiquarian book fairs -- rather than a regular removals firm. This person (and assorted relatives) made short work of it, packing most of Christina's books just as they were, in standard heavy-duty moving boxes with bubblewrap and corrugated sheets for cushioning. But for more valuable books we had the packer wrap them individually in heavy paper before putting them in boxes. The man also arranged for the overseas shipping, customs, etc. When the books arrived (in their own huge shipping container) it was the end of October, and we felt it safe to store them temporarily in our garage, which amounted to cold, dry storage. But come spring, with warming weather, we thought it best to bring them inside, away from the danger of condensation within the boxes. Not that we had a lot of room, as I had about 5,000 volumes myself at the time.

Wayne

Posted on: 2008/10/8 19:18
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



 Top
« 1 ... 29 30 31 (32) 33 34 »