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Re: Doworst in "Monash Review"
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I've been trying to read up a bit on the poem Doworst, and noted a small difference in how the title of the fanzine from the Fellowship of Middle Earth is rendered:

1) The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: Reader's Guide (p. 214) has "A Elbereth Gilthoniel!".

2) Douglas A. Anderson, in an article in Tolkien Studies, uses the title "A Elbereth Gilthoniel", without the exclamation mark (vol. III, p. 144). The author of the article on TolkienBooks.net follows Anderson's usage.

In the online catalog of Marquette University Libraries, the fanzine is listed with the exclamation mark ("elbereth" and "gilthoniel" are furthermore rendered in lower-case, which I suspect is merely a database issue). The article on the fanzine in the bibliography here on TCG does the same.

Looking at the scan of the cover of the ?first issue of the fanzine in the TCG article – is the vertical line to the right of "A Elbereth Gilthoniel" supposed to be an exclamation mark?

Well, perhaps it's impossible to establish a "correct" rendering of the title. After all, many publications have ambiguous titles (for example, is it "Lembas-extra" or "Lembas Extra"?).

Posted on: 2012/3/3 14:23

Edited by Morgan on 2012/3/4 5:02:29


Re: Doworst in "Monash Review"
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Thanks for sharing the link! I had never heard about that publication before.

And don't worry about your level of English - I'm not a native speaker either, and Khamul only teases me a little!

Posted on: 2012/2/23 9:54


Paul Raymond Gregory: From the World of Tolkien
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I have no connection to the seller, but thought it could be worth mentioning here (hard-to-get publication):

A bi-lingual (Eng/Swe) exhibition book, from the Paul Raymond Gregory (Tolkien artist) exhibition in Sweden, is offered for sale for about £16 + shipping at a Swedish dealer's site.

Paul Raymond Gregory. ur Tolkiens värld : from the world of Tolkien 2007; 79 pp, softbound, ISBN: 9188040895.

I'm not particularly interested in art books myself, but if anyone collects such, I'd be happy to help ordering the book.

Posted on: 2012/2/18 10:33

Edited by Morgan on 2012/2/18 13:04:51


Re: Tolkien letter to David Hicks
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Thank you Findegil - it appears like this letter hasn't been noted before.

Posted on: 2012/2/14 5:39


Re: New Book Releases
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For the record (I've already announced the book in a comment to the news section):

The Romance of the Middle Ages by Nicholas Perkins and Alison Wiggins (exhibition book from the Bodleian Library)

From King Arthur and the Round Table to Alexander the Great's global conquests and encounters with fire-breathing dragons, the stories of romance appear in some of the most beautiful books of the Middle Ages, and still resonate today. This book provides an engaging, scholarly, and richly illustrated guide to medieval romance and its continuing influence on literature and art. Romance's conjunctions of chivalric violence, love, sex, and piety, and its openness to the miraculous, monstrous or bizarre mark it out as the most fertile narrative form of the Western Middle Ages. This book examines the development of romance as a literary genre, its place in medieval culture, and the scribes and readers who copied, owned, and commented on romance books, from magnificent illuminated manuscripts to personal notebooks and chance survivals. It also explores the complex anatomy of human desire in romance, as portrayed by writers including Dante, Chaucer, and Thomas Malory. Medieval romance was hugely popular after the Middle Ages. Shakespeare, Spenser, and Walter Scott imbibed its motifs, Mark Twain parodied them, and the Pre-Raphaelites based an aesthetic movement around them. The Romance of the Middle Ages traces the influence of the genre to the twentieth century and beyond, encompassing the stories of Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and J.K. Rowling, the Jedi knights of Star Wars and Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

Nicholas Perkins is Fellow and Tutor in English at St Hugh's College and University Lecturer in Medieval English, University of Oxford. Alison Wiggins is Senior Lecturer in English Language at the University of Glasgow.


Posted on: 2012/2/14 5:35



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