Tolkien Collector's Guide
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Nov 13, 2018
2018/11/13 18:00:27 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
I have a copy and am planning to reach out. Anyone else want to add feedback here that I can add to the discussion?


onthetrail wrote:
I found the John Howe book very poor overall, especially when judged by its write up.

A Middle-earth Traveller presents a walking tour of Tolkien's Middle-earth, visiting not only places central to his stories, but also those just over the hill or beyond the horizon.

On that quote alone it falls short of its aims and trying to make it a mix of his work on the movies made the effort messy.

Maybe I was just assuming, but I always thought this was going to be a publication of Mr. Howe's sketches for the movies, without any additional/new material. Of course many of his sketches did not make it into the final film, so in that regard there would be some new surprises.


Sketches that have an `on-the-spot' feel to them are interwoven with the artist's observations gleaned from Tolkien's books as he paints pictures with his words as well as his pencil.

I missed the `on-the-spot' for all the art that looked like a behind the sketches of Peter Jackson's movies.

I thought it was a poor effort at a 'walking tour'.

From the Postscript in John's own words (p. 191): "We would often wait on Peter's good graces, tucked away drawing in a corner of a sound stage." He then goes on with a humorous story of shopping for the quietest pencils as the sound of sketching was audible on quiet sets. Many of the sketches in this book are those "on the set, on the spot" sketches that John had to do to keep up with the director's vision.

There are sketches (and at least one painting) from The Silmarillion here that I quite liked, and subjects not in the film like Old Man Willow and the barrow wight.

As an art book (ignoring textual issues), I do really like this book for the wide spectrum of John Howe art I haven't seen before, and he is a favorite of mine in the world of Tolkien illustration.
Nov 13, 2018
2018/11/13 19:32:02 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
I imagine I will pick up a used copy at some point, but I won't buy this one new. Sloppy work should not be rewarded (and the text would annoy me immensely).
Mar 19, 2019
2019/3/19 22:19:47 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
Anyone know anything about the 30th anniversary edition of The Annotated Hobbit currently listed on Amazon?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/000832333X ... sc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

It had a release date of 18 March, but there's still no product image and it seems to have immediately gone out of stock on reaching the publication date. There's no sign of a new edition on the HC website, so I'm left wondering whether this product really exists at all. Does anyone know any more about it?
Mar 19, 2019
2019/3/19 23:18:40 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
There are phantom dates in the “system”. This book is still being worked on by Doug, and will be officially announced closer to when it will be published.
Mar 20, 2019
2019/3/20 22:54:28 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
Thanks for the info. I'll watch out for more news then.
Sep 28, 2019
2019/9/28 14:03:16 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
"Something Has Gone Crack": New Perspectives on J.R.R.Tolkien in the Great War

Publication Date: 23rd September 2019

We are pleased to announce our latest publication "Something Has Gone Crack": New Perspectives on J.R.R.Tolkien in the Great War , edited by Janet Brennan Croft & Annika Röttinger.

http://www.walking-tree.org/books/something_has_gone_crack.php

Something has gone Crack.jpg

"Something has gone crack," Tolkien wrote about the first death among his tight-knit fellowship of friends in 1916, and the impact of the war haunted his writing for the rest of his life. In Tolkien's body of work, the Great War serves as a source of imagery, motifs, and examples of military operations and strategy; of central themes about conflict, comradeship, duty, and the destruction of the environment; and of personal trauma which he worked out in meaningful symbolic form throughout his life.
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