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Baynton, Temple, or Chelsea for Bookbinding?
Not too shy to talk
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Greetings!

Thanks to everyone's input, now I know that Asprey is currently not in the business of making fine bookbinding.

It has always been my dream to own the 1st Edition, 1st Impression Hobbit, but the one in vg to fine dustjacket is far too costly for me atm and I can not muster the courage to endure my wife's wrath for many years to come if I were to buy one.

On the other hand, I see that a rebound Hobbit is somewhat more affordable and as such, I have been spending some time, looking for the best copy to add to my meager, but a growing collection.

I am trying to pick amongst these binderies;

1) Baynton (Baynton Riviere)
2) Temple Bindery
3) Chelsea Bindery (Subsidiary of Peter Harrington)

I would like a rebound book that will continue to hold its market value (I know that I shouldn't expect any price appreciation since the popularity of Tolkien's work is somewhat dwindling).

I am inclined to buy a copy from Chelsea Bindery, but I am conflicted. A longtime collector with some communal recognition amongst Tolkienists seems to believe that Chelsea trumps Temple nowadays when it comes to aesthetics and the quality of the work done. However, upon perusing established auction houses including Sotheby's 뭉 Christie's, I haven't seen a sale of any books bound by Chelsea Bindery (but has listed plenty of works by Baynton). Does this mean that for established hardcore collectors (renowned collectors) who frequent major auction houses/esteemed rare book stores, Baynton's binding is the only accepted works, worthy of being added to their collection?

Is Chelsea Bindery the Walmart equivalent of Kay Jewelry as to Baynton Reviere the equivalent of Van Cleef & Arpels?

Posted on: 2017/11/5 3:34


Re: Baynton, Temple, or Chelsea for Bookbinding?
Shirrif
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Shirrif
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I think the problem here is "established hardcore collectors (renowned collectors)" probably prefer not to collect rebound books.

BH

Posted on: 2017/11/5 6:50
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You drive a hard bargain – you can have it for £10 all-in – one consolation (for you) is that you do not have to hear the cries of my children, for bread...


Re: Baynton, Temple, or Chelsea for Bookbinding?
Home away from home
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As a collector I would agree - don't do it I would shout and instead spend what ever monies you can on as early a Hobbit as you can with jacket. You should get a 46 or even a 42 for the same cost as a good rebind

As a seller it is always harder and longer to sell rebinds, you will be lucky to get monies back on a top quality name IMHO

Still its a personal taste thing and no wrongs or rights

Posted on: 2017/11/5 7:46


Re: Baynton, Temple, or Chelsea for Bookbinding?
Shirrif
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I agree, rebinding a Tolkien book is a nice thing to do, but almost certainly the total cost of the book and rebinding will be more than the subsequent value of the book.

I have commissioned three rebindings of my books, and all are worth less than I paid for the books and the binding costs.

I like the books so am happy, but a very poor investment.

Posted on: 2017/11/5 8:29


Re: Baynton, Temple, or Chelsea for Bookbinding?
Not too shy to talk
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Wow, thank you very much for the sage advice everyone.

What I have neglected to mention is that I will be buying an "already rebound copy" of the 1st Ed. 1st Imp Hobbit at around $10k-$13k price range.

I understand that it would be a foolhardy venture to purchase a sound copy of 1st Ed. 1st Imp Hobbit without DJ and having it rebound by one of the binderies, as doing so will not only diminish its value, but also toll me with another hundreds of dollars (possibly thousands) for the bindery fees.

Being an avid art collector, I am no stranger to the fact that buying the most celebrated and best-quality artwork of an artist will hold value over lesser ones by the same artist. As such, I can not muster the courage to buy any lesser-edition ones of the Hobbit, no matter how authentic and genuine they are. In addition, the fact that listing of 2nd edition copies are completely absent from major auction houses makes me believe that the market for the subsequent edition books are very small.

I have found several examples of rebound books that were sold @ Christie's and Sotheby's. They command around the price tag of $10k-$15k. Are you telling me that through the passage of time, I will see an unimaginable drop in the value of these rebound books and/or there will be no market for the rebound copies of the 1st Ed. 1st Imp. Hobbit?

As I only see Baynton or Asprey rebound copies being sold at Sotheby's and Christie's, does that mean one rebound by Chelsea is of subpar value relative to the aforementioned ones?

Posted on: 2017/11/5 9:33



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