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Re: New Book Releases
Shirrif
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Trotter wrote:
(the title mentions the Art of the Hobbit but that will be in his next post).


http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2011/11/art-of-hobbit.html

Posted on: 2011/11/14 22:14


Re: New Book Releases
Shirrif
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Looks like this book has finally been published

Green Suns and Faerie
Essays on J. R. R. Tolkien


Verlyn Flieger

A major contribution to the growing body of Tolkien scholarship

With the release of Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy and forthcoming film version of The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien’s popularity has never been higher. In Green Suns and Faërie, author Verlyn Flieger, one of world’s foremost Tolkien scholars, presents a selection of her best articles—some never before published—on a range of Tolkien topics.

The essays are divided into three distinct sections. The first explores Tolkien’s ideas of sub-creation–the making of a Secondary World and its relation to the real world, the second looks at Tolkien’s reconfiguration of the medieval story tradition, and the third places his work firmly within the context of the twentieth century and “modernist” literature. With discussions ranging from Tolkien’s concepts of the hero to the much-misunderstood nature of Bilbo’s last riddle in The Hobbit, Flieger reveals Tolkien as a man of both medieval learning and modern sensibility—one who is deeply engaged with the past and future, the regrets and hopes, the triumphs and tragedies, and above all the profound difficulties and dilemmas of his troubled century.

Taken in their entirety, these essays track a major scholar’s deepening understanding of the work of the master of fantasy. Green Suns and Faërie is sure to become a cornerstone of Tolkien scholarship.



http://www.kentstateuniversitypress.c ... 11/green-suns-and-faerie/

Posted on: 2012/2/13 22:46


Re: New Book Releases
Home away from home
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This is a rhetorical question - why should a description of a serious book about Tolkien begin with references to Peter Jackson?!

I'm officially disgruntled.


Posted on: 2012/2/14 1:14


Re: New Book Releases
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garm wrote:
This is a rhetorical question - why should a description of a serious book about Tolkien begin with references to Peter Jackson?!

I'm officially disgruntled.




Hee Hee, you are easily disgruntled.

But I agree with you :)

Posted on: 2012/2/14 1:31


Re: New Book Releases
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For the record (I've already announced the book in a comment to the news section):

The Romance of the Middle Ages by Nicholas Perkins and Alison Wiggins (exhibition book from the Bodleian Library)

From King Arthur and the Round Table to Alexander the Great's global conquests and encounters with fire-breathing dragons, the stories of romance appear in some of the most beautiful books of the Middle Ages, and still resonate today. This book provides an engaging, scholarly, and richly illustrated guide to medieval romance and its continuing influence on literature and art. Romance's conjunctions of chivalric violence, love, sex, and piety, and its openness to the miraculous, monstrous or bizarre mark it out as the most fertile narrative form of the Western Middle Ages. This book examines the development of romance as a literary genre, its place in medieval culture, and the scribes and readers who copied, owned, and commented on romance books, from magnificent illuminated manuscripts to personal notebooks and chance survivals. It also explores the complex anatomy of human desire in romance, as portrayed by writers including Dante, Chaucer, and Thomas Malory. Medieval romance was hugely popular after the Middle Ages. Shakespeare, Spenser, and Walter Scott imbibed its motifs, Mark Twain parodied them, and the Pre-Raphaelites based an aesthetic movement around them. The Romance of the Middle Ages traces the influence of the genre to the twentieth century and beyond, encompassing the stories of Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and J.K. Rowling, the Jedi knights of Star Wars and Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

Nicholas Perkins is Fellow and Tutor in English at St Hugh's College and University Lecturer in Medieval English, University of Oxford. Alison Wiggins is Senior Lecturer in English Language at the University of Glasgow.


Posted on: 2012/2/14 5:35



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