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A very special 1987 Hobbit 50th Anniversary Publicity Kit

24 February - By Urulókë

folder-front-cover-web.jpg

The cover of the publicity kit with Roger Garland artwork featured



In 1986, Tolkien's publisher Unwin Hyman began to circulate their plans for the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Hobbit - a full year of events, contests, and new editions of The Hobbit and other Tolkien books to celebrate the anniversary. Part of their effort to publicize what was coming was a packet of material to be shared with press and booksellers. This publicity kit generally came with a copy of a letter from Rayner Unwin, publicity documentation, book cover art, a poster, and a booklet written by Brian Alderson. It is impossible to tell after more than thirty years if these sets ever were uniform in their contents, as items may have been removed by fans or collectors, and additional items may occasionally have been inserted at a later date for any number of reasons.


A week ago, a bookseller listing was brought to my attention (again). It had been mentioned on the TolkienGuide forums a year ago at a very high price (to my mind), and evidently not garnered any interest as the seller dropped the price by a third last week. That was enough for me to click through and read the listing, and I noticed something I hadn't before. The seller mentions, at the end of a list of typical contents for a kit such as this, that it contained "photocopied letters between Tolkien and his publishers." That caught my eye - I hadn't ever heard that anyone's publicity kit contained such items, though the Alderson booklet has a reproduced letter in it, and the packet contains a photocopied letter from Rayner (Tolkien's publisher), so it seemed possible that was all the seller had. My gut told me something more might be hiding in this folder, so I took a leap of faith and ordered the set. A few days later, it arrived - quite impressively packed, so I must give a huge hat tip to the bookseller Vandello Books for such an excellent job.

bookseller-ad-web.jpg

Vandello Books original catalog listing from 2023



The folder was rather thick. The artwork and publisher's flyers were all in absolutely fine condition, appearing to have never been taken out, so I was already happy with my purchase.

hobbit-50th-howe-poster-web.jpg

John Howe poster sample



At the back of the packet, though was the absolute treasure hoard that I was hoping for. In photocopy form, there are fourteen complete letters written by J.R.R. Tolkien from 1937-1938, four complete letters from Stanley Unwin written to Tolkien in this same time period, and the letter from the German publisher who wanted to translate The Hobbit if Tolkien would only sign a statement saying he was of Aryan descent. The Tolkien letters have all been published by Carpenter, but after reading through them, I have found that most (70%) of the photocopied originals have differences from their Carpenter versions, some quite significant. Of course none of the Stanley Unwin letters are in Carpenter, nor is the German letter, though those have been documented in summary form in Scull and Hammond's excellent Chronology - seeing those in complete form was relevatory as well.

press-kit-full-contents.jpg

All of the contents of this particular publicity kit



31 of Carpenter's letters are now "green" in our Guide (meaning we have seen the original letter and are aware of its entire contents), with the addition of these 14. This cache of photocopies almost doubled the number of Carpenter's selected letters where we can now compare the original document directly to what has been published in the book, allowing a glimpse into the process that Humphrey Carpenter and Christopher Tolkien likely used when editing for publication.

There are three types of editorial changes that this comparison reveals:
  • Removal of material (the published "...." marks in various letters; or, when the material is at the start or end of the letter, silently left off)
  • Corrections for small, common mistakes like inserting missing words or punctuation, when this improves legibility
  • Apparent mistakes in transcription, e.g. where words have been removed without any obvious reason

The first type are of course the most interesting, but I am holding off on even summarizing what those elided materials are while I talk with the Estate, out of an abundance of caution - I am not the first to have seen this "new" material, but some of it is not even summarized in Chronology so there may be some reason for privacy that I wish to respect. More soon, hopefully.

An interesting editorial decision was made in Letter 17. Halfway through the letter, Tolkien writes "All the same I am little perturbed." Carpenter, on the other hand, has changed this to "All the same I am a little perturbed." The addition of "a" might seem small, but it completely reverses the meaning of this sentence. Carpenter apparently thinks Tolkien forgot the wordthe handwriting is quite clear, this is not a case of difficult reading - but Tolkien has in other cases accidentally left words out when writing letters so this would not be the first time this sort of editorial assist has been needed.[1] , but the sentence parses correctly both ways. I truly wonder, now, which meaning Tolkien actually intended. It changes the tone of the entire next paragraph, if Carpenter was wrong. Notably, Letter 17 is also the one with the most editorial mistakes (four times as many as any other letter in this set), so it appears from afar that this letter was not carefully read when being transcribed originally and the "a" may have been inserted without noticing that Tolkien hadn't written it.

Some of the photocopies show some interesting comments from the publisher written on them as well. For example, in Letter 13, Tolkien has asked "can you tell me the name of the firm" in America that might be publishing The Hobbit, and someone else has drawn a line from that to the word "answered" they have written above. The same happens at the bottom of the same letter where Tolkien has asked if the date for publication of the English edition is approaching.

The Blackwell's Hoard


Differences are noted by type. For type #3 (apparent mistakes in Carpenter's transcription), I have written them as [Carpenter] > [Photocopy].

Carpenter's Letter #9 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Susan Dagnall, 4 January 1937)
  • (in Chapter I) > (to Chapter I)

Carpenter's Letter #12 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Allen & Unwin Ltd., 13 April 1937)
  • (Material removed in published letter)

Carpenter's Letter #13 (J.R.R. Tolkien to C.A. Furth, 13 May 1937)
  • (Material removed in published letter)

Carpenter's Letter #14 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Allen & Unwin Ltd., 28 May 1937)
  • (Material removed in published letter)
  • indulging in exams or in 'frivolities'. > indulging either in exams or in 'frivolities'.

Carpenter's Letter #15 (J.R.R. Tolkien to C.A. Furth (Allen & Unwin), 31 August 1937)
  • they cannot be used for that book. > they cannot be used for that book.
  • The commentary on the dust jacket blurb is not included in this photocopy, just the letter itself

Letter from Stanley Unwin to J.R.R. Tolkien • 11th October 1937 (#1987)

Carpenter's Letter #17 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Stanley Unwin, 15 October 1937)
  • All the same I am a little perturbed. > All the same I am little perturbed.
  • material for treatment > material suitable for treatment
  • much too much for Richard > much too much of Richard
  • in any case, I could bring Mr Bliss > in any case, if I could bring Mr Bliss

Carpenter's Letter #18 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Stanley Unwin, 23 October 1937)
  • The photocopy and Carpenters (revised edition) transcript match

Carpenter's Letter #19 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Stanley Unwin, 16 December 1937)
  • Possible that a comma was changed to a semi-colon (photocopy quality prevents final determination) but otherwise the published letter matches.

Carpenter's Letter #22 (J.R.R. Tolkien to C.A. Furth, 4 February 1938)
  • The photocopy and Carpenters (revised edition) transcript match (this letter has also been previously reproduced elsewhere)

Letter from Stanley Unwin to J.R.R. Tolkien • 11th February 1938 (#1988)

Carpenter's Letter #24 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Stanley Unwin, 18 February 1938)
  • and for the moment the story > and at the moment the story

Letter from Stanley Unwin to J.R.R. Tolkien • 3rd May, 1938 (#1989)

Letter from Stanley Unwin to J.R.R. Tolkien • 1st June, 1938 (#1991)

Carpenter's Letter #28 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Stanley Unwin, June 4th 1938)
  • (Material removed in published letter)
  • more than adventures; > more than their adventures;

Letter from Rütten & Loening Verlag, Potsdam to J.R.R. Tolkien • 22 July 1938 (#1981)

Carpenter's Letter #31 (J.R.R. Tolkien to C.A. Furth, 24 July 1938)
  • It appears that Tolkien may have had a paragraph break that Carpenter ignored, but otherwise the published letter matches

Carpenter's Letter #29 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Stanley Unwin, July 25th 1938)
  • (Material removed in published letter)
  • appearing in print > appearing anywhere in print

Carpenter's Letter #30 (J.R.R. Tolkien to Rütten & Loening Verlag, July 25th 1938)
  • (Material removed in published letter)

As you can see from the above list, out of fourteen Carpenter letters now seen in manuscript form, only four (18, 19, 22, 31) are essentially the same - almost 70%Letter 18 is only six sentences long and Letter 22 is seven sentences - discounting those as near impossible to mis-transcribe brings the percentage up to well over 80%.[2] of these letters have corrections or additional material. This matches the experience I have seen with other Carpenter letters where comparison is possible (e.g. the Dick Plotz letters). It is amazing to me what a eye-opening experience it has been to see these few letters, even in photocopy form, when I thought there was nothing more to learn after Carpenter's publication of them. A fascinating benefit of doing this Guide to Tolkien's Letters project, and I have never been more happy to have paid significant money for a few photocopies.

Other material in this publicity kit


  • Blackwell's mailing envelope with handwritten "The Hobbit 50th Anniversary 1937-1987" title
  • Blackwell's "With compliments" slip with handwritten note
  • Folder with Roger Garland illustration on front, Unwin Hyman paperback information on rear
  • Unwin paperback wrapper sample
  • John Howe poster
  • Hardcover dustjacket sample
  • Photo print of planned bookstore promotional displays and materials
  • The Hobbit 50th Anniversary commemorative booklet, with Blackwell Bookshop logo
  • Explanatory letter from Rayner Unwin, October 1986 ("signed" but this is a copy of the signed letter)
  • Marketing strategy sheet, 2 sided
  • Publishing strategy sheet
  • New title and Point of Sale order form, 2 sided
  • Tolkien backlist order form, 2 sided

50th-booklet-alderson-web.jpg
hardcover-jacket-sample-web.jpg
paperback-wraps-sample-web.jpg
photo-of-pos-materials-web.jpg

1 the handwriting is quite clear, this is not a case of difficult reading - but Tolkien has in other cases accidentally left words out when writing letters so this would not be the first time this sort of editorial assist has been needed.
2 Letter 18 is only six sentences long and Letter 22 is seven sentences - discounting those as near impossible to mis-transcribe brings the percentage up to well over 80%.
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Bonhams Auction 1st/1st UK LOTR

21 February - By Trotter

Wed, 20 Mar 2024 1:00 PM GMT London, Knightsbridge

Lot 131 - [The Lord of the Rings], FIRST EDITIONS, FIRST IMPRESSIONS, George Allen and Unwin, [1954-1955]

Lot131.jpg

[The Lord of the Rings] The Fellowship of the Ring; The Two Towers; The Return of the King, together 3 vol., FIRST EDITION, FIRST IMPRESSIONS, 'The Return of the King' with signature mark "4" and sagging text on p.49, folding map printed in red and black at end of each volume, publisher's red cloth (worn, 'Fellowship' with upper cover damp-stained, upper joint split; 'The Two Towers' with lower spine frayed; 'Return' with mild damp-stains to spine and lower parts of cover, spine ends frayed), dust-jackets (all with some soiling, spine of 'Fellowship' with loss to lower third and upper section including author's initials, joints splitting; 'Two Towers' with short tear at lower joint, frayed at spine ends and corners; 'Return' with split at lower joint and front flap, rear flap near loose, spine soiled and frayed affecting a few letters), 8vo, George Allen and Unwin, [1954-1955]

Estimate GBP 2,000 - 4,000

https://www.bonhams.com/auction/29869/ ... llen-and-unwin-1954-1955/
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On this day

19 February - By Urulókë


Have you noticed the "On This Day" tidbits shown here and there on TolkienGuide and social media? At this time it has news items from prior years on this site, and also letters from the Letters Guide. Book milestones and other items will be coming soon as well.

https://www.tolkienguide.com/onthisday

There's a simple form box at the top of the page, so you can look at any day of the year, not just "today" - you can see what letters were sent on someone's birthday for example.
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J. R. R. Tolkien Signed Book - Puffin Hobbit

16 February - By Trotter

Lot 444 Adam Partridge Auctions Wed, 28 Feb 2024 10:00 AM GMT

You should always exercise good judgement and perform appropriate due-diligence when acquiring signed items to ensure that you are satisfied with the provenance and integrity of any item you bid on.

Lot444.jpg

JOHN RONALD REUEL TOLKIEN (1892-1972), THE HOBBIT, first paperback edition, signed by the author in blue ink on the title page, Puffin Book No 161, 1961; sold with copy of the dust jacket design for the book, believed to be a design proof or an unused jacket , by Pauline Baynes and signed by the artist in blue biro to the name aperture, 35 x 35cm, framed and glazed; sold with two further copies of the 1961 first edition paperback (4)

Provenance:
Purchased in 2003 from St. Mary's Books & Prints of Stamford, with three documents from the bookseller, comprising a signed statement of verification from St. Mary's detailing that the autograph has been verified by 'a leading autograph specialist', a deposit invoice for the Hobbit book dated 15/02/03, and a further letter with information about hardback signed Hobbit from the booksellers customer Mr Postgate. Also, a photocopy of a typed and signed letter from the original owner of the book, Ian C. Postgate, detailing the circumstances in which the book was signed for him which are detailed below. This book was originally owned by Ian C. Postgate, a student at Malvern College studying Anglo-Saxon and Early English under Mr. George Sayer. Mr. Sayer was aware of his student's interest in Tolkien, Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University, and, as he himself was a good friend of Tolkien's, arranged for Tolkien to sign the book while on a visit to Oxford and gifted this autographed copy to Mr. Postgate who kept it for forty years before selling it to St. Mary's. Mr. Sayer is credited as the person who convinced a depressed Tolkien not to burn the manuscripts of The Lord of the Rings when he was struggling to find a publisher, hence this book holds additional significance for Tolkien enthusiasts. It is possibly the only copy that Tolkien signed for his good friend Mr. Sayer. Mr. Sayer was also involved in the editing the Lord of the Rings manuscripts, and is believed influential in obtaining a publishing deal with Allen & Unwin. He regularly received Tolkien at his home and it was at his home that Tolkien recorded excerpts from The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings in 1952 which were later released as LP records.

This book was sold in auction by Adam Partridge Auctioneers on 5th November 2020, Lot 365. The buyer of the book has consigned it to this auction with the additional unsigned copies and the Pauline Baynes signed cover design which is believed to be a proof. There are four proof copies of the cover design in the Pauline Baynes archive held in the library at Williams College Massachusetts.

Also accompanying this lot is a signed letter detailing provenance for the Pauline Baynes book cover and signature. It was discovered in a scrap book relating to an exhibition at Corby Grammar School on the 20th and 21st November 1961, to encourage children to buy paper backs. From this album it has been framed with the signature and was purchased by the current vendor from the gentleman who has penned this letter.

Estimate GBP 4,000-5,000

https://auctions.adampartridge.co.uk/a ... False&sd=0&pp=48&pn=1&g=1

This was the previous sale in November 2020 and it looks like repairs have been made to the book since this sale.

https://live.adampartridge.co.uk/m/lot ... log%2Fid%2F211%3Fpage%3D8

Sold for GBP 4,000
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Tolkien and The Swan Press

9 February - By Trotter

IMG_3251 (Large).JPG

Yorkshire Poetry (1922 edition, not the edition with Tolkien's contribution), A Northern Venture and Leeds University Verse 1914-24



This article is primarily about the Swan Press and Tolkien's contributions made during his tenure at Leeds University.

Tolkien's contributions appear in

  • A Northern Venture
  • Yorkshire Poetry Volume 2 Number 19 October–November 1923
  • Leeds University Verse 1914-1924

As all three of these publications are now antiques and in the Public Domain, I am able to display images from the publications of Tolkien's contributions.

Additionally, Tolkien contributed to The Gryphon (University of Leeds) and The Microcosm (North Country Press).

Tolkien at Leeds University



Tolkien moved to Leeds in 1920 and took up his role at the English Department at the University

Early in 1922 a new junior lecturer was appointed to the language side of the English Department at Leeds, a young man named E. V. Gordon. This small dark Canadian (who was unrelated to George Gordon) had been a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, and Tolkien had tutored him during 1920. Now he made him very welcome in Leeds. ‘Eric Valentine Gordon has come and got firmly established and is my devoted friend and pal,’ he wrote in his diary.

Soon after Gordon’s arrival the two men began to collaborate on a major piece of scholarship. Tolkien had been working for some time at a glossary for a book of Middle English extracts that his former tutor Kenneth Sisam had edited. This meant in effect compiling a small Middle English dictionary, a task that he undertook with infinite precision and much imagination. The glossary took a long time to complete, but it reached print early in 1922, by which time Tolkien wanted to turn his hand to something that would give greater scope to his scholarship. He and E. V. Gordon decided to compile a new edition of the Middle English poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, as there was none in print that was suitable for university students. Tolkien was to be responsible for the text and glossary while Gordon would provide the greater part of the notes.Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 145). HarperCollins Publishers.[1]

E. V. Gordon shared Tolkien’s sense of humour. Together the two men helped to form a Viking Club among the undergraduates, which met to drink large quantities of beer, read sagas, and sing comic songs. These were mostly written by Tolkien and Gordon, who made up rude verses about the students, translated nursery rhymes into Anglo-Saxon, and sang drinking songs in Old Norse. Several of their verses were printed privately some years later as Songs for the Philologists.Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 146). HarperCollins Publishers.[2]

He had been composing a good deal of verse over the last few years. Much of it was concerned with his mythology. Some found its way into print in the Leeds university magazine The Gryphon, in a local series called Yorkshire Poetry, and in a book of verses by members of the English Department entitled Northern Venture.Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 146). HarperCollins Publishers. [3]

Tolkien became Professor of English Language before his move back to Oxford University in 1925 and Humphrey Carpenter states
And after this, you might say, nothing else really happened.Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 150). HarperCollins Publishers.[4]

The Swan Press



IMG_3056.JPG

At the sign of the swan



The Swan Press was a small publishing house founded by Sydney Matthewman in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, in 1921. It published poetry, plays, and translations of classical and foreign literature, often with illustrations by local artists. Some of the authors associated with the press were Matthew Arnold, Herbert Read, and Phyllis Matthewman. The press moved to London in 1929 and ceased operations in the 1930s.

Matthewman, Sydney.jpg

Sydney Matthewman (scanned photograph by Michael Green), the frontispiece to Poems (1927)Lesser-Known Writers S. Matthewman - Douglas A Anderson http://desturmobed.blogspot.com/2012/06/s-matthewman.html[5]



For more information on Sydney Matthewman and the Swan Press, please look at these articles


A Northern Venture



The book was published in June 1923 for 1 shilling and 6 pence and 170 copies were printed. It was reprinted in July 1923 at a reduced price, 1 shilling and 200 copies were printed. This is labelled as the 'second edition' but is really the second impression. The images shown are from the 'second edition' and I am not aware of any significant changes between the two editions.

This publication includes three poems contributed by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Tha Eadigan Saelidan: The Happy Mariners

The poem was previously published in a revised form in The Stapeldon Magazine in 1920. It was later published in Tolkien and the Great War and The Book of Lost Tales Part Two.

  • Why The Man In The Moon Came Down Too Soon

This poem was reprinted in revised form in The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and The Book of Lost Tales Part One.

  • Enigmata Saxonica Nuper Inventa Duo

This poem was included in the second edition of The Annotated Hobbit.

Northern Venture Advert.jpg

Advert in Yorkshire Poetry


Northern Venture Review.jpeg

Review of A Northern Venture - The Times Literary Supplement 1923https://www.tolkienguide.com/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?post_id=24408#forumpost24408[6]


IMG_3055.JPG

Cover of A Northern Venture


IMG_3057.JPG

The Eadigan Saelidan (The Happy Mariners) by J.R.R. Tolkien


IMG_3058.JPG

The Eadigan Saelidan (The Happy Mariners) by J.R.R. Tolkien cont. and Why the Man in the Moon Came Down Too Soon by J.R.R. Tolkien


IMG_3059.JPG

Why the Man in the Moon Came Down Too Soon by J.R.R. Tolkien cont.


IMG_3060.JPG

Enigmata Saxonica Nuper Inventa Duo by J.R.R. Tolkien



Yorkshire Poetry Volume 2 Number 19 October–November 1923Images shown are from copies held by the British Library[7]



This publication includes one poem by J.R.R. Tolkien and was published in October 1923 for 4 pence. I do not have any information on the number of copies printed.

  • The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked.
The poem is reprinted in Three Early Poems and a revised version of the poem is published in The Adventures of Tom Bombadil.

20231026_124521.jpg

Yorkshire Poetry Volume 2 Number 19 October–November 1923 cover


20231026_124543.jpg

Yorkshire Poetry Volume 2 Number 19 October–November 1923 editorial


The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked, Yorkshire Poetry, Vol. 11 No. 19, October-November 1923 page 1.jpg

The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked by J.R.R. Tolkien


The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked, Yorkshire Poetry, Vol. 11 No. 19, October-November 1923 page 2.jpg

The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked by J.R.R. Tolkien cont.


The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked, Yorkshire Poetry, Vol. 11 No. 19, October-November 1923 page 3.jpg

The Cat and the Fiddle A Nursery-Rhyme Undone and its Scandalous Secret Unlocked by J.R.R. Tolkien cont.



Leeds University Verse 1914-1924



This publication includes three poems contributed by J.R.R. Tolkien. The book was printed in May 1924 for 2 shillings and 500 copies were printed.

  • An Evening in Tavrobel
Reprinted in Three Early Poems.

  • The Lonely Isle
Reprinted in Tolkien and the Great War

  • The Princess Ní
Reprinted in Three Early Poems. This poem was revised as Princess Mee, which is published in The Adventures of Tom Bombadil.

IMG_3048.JPG

Leeds University Verse 1914-1924 cover


IMG_3049.JPG

Leeds University Verse 1914-1924 rear


IMG_3050.JPG

Leeds University Verse 1914-1924 title-page


IMG_3051.JPG

Leeds University Verse 1914-1924 contents


IMG_3052.JPG

Leeds University Verse 1914-1924 advertisment


IMG_3053.JPG

An Evening in Tavrobel and The Lonely Isle by J.R.R. Tolkien


The Princess Ni, Leeds University Verse, 1924.jpg

The Princess Ni. by J.R.R. Tolkien



Collecting these items



These are very difficult to collect, due to the scarcity of the items, and they are very old and fragile items. They are ranked in terms of scarity

1 - Yorkshire Poetry
2 - A Northern Venture
3 - Leeds University Verse 1914-1924

But they very rarely appear on the secondary market and have very high prices when they do. Lucius Books has a copy of Leeds University Verse 1914-1924 listed for GBP 4,000. I really liked the clamshell case design from this listing, so copied it for my editions.

IMG_3247 (Large).JPG
IMG_3250 (Large).JPG

Other material


  • Father Christmas Letters
Tolkien started to write these letters during his time at Leeds. More about the Father Christmas Letters will be added to the site soon.
  • Songs for the Philologists
I hope to do a seperate article on this unauthorised edition later this year.
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight


Other resources


  • Leeds University Website Gryphon Magazine
- Vol. 4, No. 3 December 1922
- Vol. 4, No. 3 January 1923
- Vol. 6, No. 6 June 1925

Credits



  • Hammond & Anderson (H&A) - J.R.R. Tolkien - A Descriptive Bibliography
This site uses affiliate links for which we may be compensated

J.R.R. Tolkien - A Descriptive Bibliography

Oak Knoll (1993)


$128.41 Blackwell's (book) - Availability: Unknown

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The Book of Lost Tales 1 (UK Edition)

HarperCollins (2024-01-18)


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  • Book of Lost Tales Part 2
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The Book of Lost Tales 2 (UK Edition)

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  • Tolkien & The Great War
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Tolkien and the Great War

HarperCollins Publishers (2004-09-03)


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  • The Adventures of Tom Bombadil
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The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and Other Verses from The Red Book

HarperCollins (2014-10-09)


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  • The Annotated Hobbit (2nd edition)
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The Annotated Hobbit (2002)

Houghton Mifflin (2002)


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Disclaimer



Under the copyright law of the United States every work published prior to 1928 is public domain, all the publications shown were published prior to 1928. Image copyright © belongs to the tolkienguide.com.

1 Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 145). HarperCollins Publishers.
2 Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 146). HarperCollins Publishers.
3 Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 146). HarperCollins Publishers.
4 Carpenter, Humphrey. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography (p. 150). HarperCollins Publishers.
5 Lesser-Known Writers S. Matthewman - Douglas A Anderson http://desturmobed.blogspot.com/2012/06/s-matthewman.html
6 https://www.tolkienguide.com/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?post_id=24408#forumpost24408
7 Images shown are from copies held by the British Library
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