Tolkien Collector's Guide
Nov 10, 2019
2019/11/10 18:57:10 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia

insurrbution wrote:
something that people will likely get, because it says "Tolkien" on the cover, but unless you're an Old English scholar, most Tolkien fans - of any level - may not find it of use.

To be fair "most Tolkien fans - of any level - may not find it of use." goes for a majority of the posthumous publications. I suspect far more end up as unread shelf adornments than anything else. It is what happens when you take everything (yes, hyperbole, I know) an author worked on, finished or unfinished, and then dedicate an individual volume to it... So long as the marketing about what it is is clear and honest, it isn't too much of a problem. I do think the odd one as been really pushing it. e.g. The Lay of Aotrou & Itroun probably should have been in a compilation -- I thought the commentary on it was somewhat weak due to being padded out to fill a book.
Nov 11, 2019
2019/11/11 0:49:40 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
Actually, that may not be a bad thing. I am not an “Old English scholar“, or any type of scholar for that matter, but I have read all the supplemental Tolkien books that HC has released lately, since I like myths and legends and histories, and imo HC has made these “accessible” to me through these publications.

Yes, I will admit the draw for me was Tolkien’s name on the cover, but it’s opened my world to these other works.

If releasing these sorts of materials which Tolkien worked on brings more people to explore literature, I don’t see it as a bad thing.

And it’s not like they’re faking by slapping Tolkien’s name on
Nov 11, 2019
2019/11/11 2:26:25 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia

Eorl wrote:
Actually, that may not be a bad thing. I am not an “Old English scholar“, or any type of scholar for that matter, but I have read all the supplemental Tolkien books that HC has released lately, since I like myths and legends and histories, and imo HC has made these “accessible” to me through these publications.

Yes, I will admit the draw for me was Tolkien’s name on the cover, but it’s opened my world to these other works.

If releasing these sorts of materials which Tolkien worked on brings more people to explore literature, I don’t see it as a bad thing.

And it’s not like they’re faking by slapping Tolkien’s name on

Yeah, like I say, as long as the marketing is appropriate, I don't have any issue with it. I think some of it (and I mentioned a specific example) has been a bit "thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread". When the analysis and essays vastly outsize the Tolkien content, I think there is something a little wrong, especially if those essays have characteristics of "bloat". Equally, no one is being forced to buy any of it.
Nov 11, 2019
2019/11/11 3:57:40 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
Agreed Stu.
Nov 14, 2019
2019/11/14 19:22:16 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
I have misworded my initial thoughts:

I mean to say that the target audience of Finn & Hengest to be quite narrow. Going from biggest to smallest, we have the following levels:

- The Hobbit
- The Lord of the Rings

OK, those that made it through, and enjoyed The Lord of the Rings (is is a tricky read and not for everyone. I of course loved it) there is:

- The Silmarillion
- Unfinished Tales

Then, for the "true fans" of Middle-earth (as in those that want to 'gobble up' as much as they can) there's The History of Middle-earth.

Finally you have Tolkien as the Professor:

- The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun
- The Fall of Arthur
- Beowulf
- The Story of Kullervo

There's more, and of course let's not forget about the other material (ie, Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Letters From Father Christmas, etc.)

I did that to illustrate that there are a lot more readers who have read The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings, than those who have read The History of Middle-earth, or the more academic related books.

Of course, I am speaking generally and in broad senses.
Nov 14, 2019
2019/11/14 20:18:29 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia

insurrbution wrote:
I have misworded my initial thoughts:

I mean to say that the target audience of Finn & Hengest to be quite narrow. Going from biggest to smallest, we have the following levels:

- The Hobbit
- The Lord of the Rings

OK, those that made it through, and enjoyed The Lord of the Rings (is is a tricky read and not for everyone. I of course loved it) there is:

- The Silmarillion
- Unfinished Tales

Then, for the "true fans" of Middle-earth (as in those that want to 'gobble up' as much as they can) there's The History of Middle-earth.

Finally you have Tolkien as the Professor:

- The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun
- The Fall of Arthur
- Beowulf
- The Story of Kullervo

There's more, and of course let's not forget about the other material (ie, Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Letters From Father Christmas, etc.)

I did that to illustrate that there are a lot more readers who have read The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings, than those who have read The History of Middle-earth, or the more academic related books.

Of course, I am speaking generally and in broad senses.


Personally, I'd rank "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" above HoME for readability. Not everyone might like it, but it is a fairly easy read. HoME really requires a bit of dedication, and I think most people pick and choose the bits of most interest.
Nov 15, 2019
2019/11/15 7:30:29 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia

Stu wrote:
If anyone does happen to be in contact with HC at any point, I'd be interested in the size of the print run for the 1st impression of Father Christmas. I'd guess that it would perhaps be larger than some or the more niche editions (IIRC Fall of Arthur was 2,000 copies).

Spoke to HC yesterday evening at the Alan Lee signing event in Picadilly for the Hobbit sketchbook, 4000 copies of Father Christmas letters were produced.
Nov 15, 2019
2019/11/15 7:59:18 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia

emilien wrote:
...with the original preface of Christopher Tolkien plus an essay of 1953 by JRR Tolkien (it's unclear what it is since I was not given any details about it)...

I would assume that this is The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth http://tolkienbooks.net/php/details2.php?id=285
Nov 15, 2019
2019/11/15 8:22:42 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia

Trotter wrote:

Stu wrote:
If anyone does happen to be in contact with HC at any point, I'd be interested in the size of the print run for the 1st impression of Father Christmas. I'd guess that it would perhaps be larger than some or the more niche editions (IIRC Fall of Arthur was 2,000 copies).

Spoke to HC yesterday evening at the Alan Lee signing event in Picadilly for the Hobbit sketchbook, 4000 copies of Father Christmas letters were produced.

That's exactly what I had thought most likely - same as the print run for the Facsimile Hobbit. Thanks for getting that number.
Jan 3
2020/1/3 9:28:13 (GMT) Greenwich Mean Time, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Casablanca, Monrovia
Any news about the Deluxe edition of Sir Gawain ?
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