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2 Mar, 2023
2023-3-2 11:55:47 PM UTC

LanceFormation wrote:

Aelfwine wrote:

I pointed Harper Collins to my (now itself out-of-date) list of corrections (https://elvish.org/errata/NoMe-Errata.pdf), but I don't know whether any of them have been incorporated (nor do I yet have a copy of the paperback to check).

Carl

I did some spot checking (about a dozen random items from the list) and it appears the corrections have been incorporated. Especially “Mind-pictures” ?

(Added: I actually checked the first 32 entries of the errata thru this entry: “p. 112, n. 7: Correct the alignment of the left margin.” Everything checks out as incorporated.)

Aelfwine I had time so I finished checking the entire errata you pointed to. I found that every item in the list checks out as corrected except:

p. 426 s.v. Gil-galad: after “78,”, insert “81,”; after “347,” insert “359, 361,”.

Looks like they did incorporate 359 and 361, but missed 81. And I double checked page 81 and Gilgalad is in the text.

So please take my effort as just a quick pass…I may have missed something.

Lance

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3 Mar, 2023
2023-3-3 12:02:38 AM UTC
Thanks!
4 Mar, 2023
2023-3-4 1:12:15 AM UTC
I just received my UK (HarperCollins) paperback. It does have page 81 for Gil-galad.

It seems that the UK and US paperbacks have officially diverged ?

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4 Mar, 2023
2023-3-4 1:21:28 AM UTC

Urulókë wrote:

I just received my UK (HarperCollins) paperback. It does have page 81 for Gil-galad.

It seems that the UK and US paperbacks have officially diverged ?

Egads!
27 Sep, 2023
2023-9-27 8:53:41 PM UTC
I have updated my list of Nature of Middle-earth errata. Please spread the word and link as appropriate.

https://elvish.org/errata/NoMe-Errata.pdf

Thanks,

Carl
26 February
2024-2-26 11:42:24 AM UTC
The translation of ‘The Nature of Middle-earth’ into Russian (17 February 2024) has a different picture on its cover, also drawn by Ted Nasmith. The errors of the original edition are corrected. The Foreword and other prefatory notes by Carl Hostetter are on pages xvii–xxvii, not xi–xxi, as in the original edition, because of the ‘Foreword of the Translator and Editor’ (of the translation) and ‘Note on Bibliography’ are added on pp. xi–xvi; otherwise its pagination repeats the English edition; at the end (pp. 453–467) the paper ‘Carl Hostetter, The Successor of Christopher Tolkien’ is added, prepared by one of the translators of the book. There are 9 translators (including the editor Svetlana Likhacheva who made the photo of the covers) overall, who translated different chapters.

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26 February
2024-2-26 3:22:52 PM UTC
"Carl Hostetter, The Successor of Christopher Tolkien" —

Oh dear. I hope the source Russian for this doesn't sound so ... momentous? It's true only in the sense that I was given the opportunity to edit a substantial volume of Tolkien's writings about Middle-earth after Christopher had completed his own work on same. But that's it. No torch was passed; no "succession" occurred.
26 February
2024-2-26 3:30:43 PM UTC

Aelfwine wrote:

"Carl Hostetter, The Successor of Christopher Tolkien" —

Oh dear. I hope the source Russian for this doesn't sound so ... momentous? It's true only in the sense that I was given the opportunity to edit a substantial volume of Tolkien's writings about Middle-earth after Christopher had completed his own work on same. But that's it. No torch was passed; no "succession" occurred.

That's a shame 😅 I was waiting with excitement for the announcement of your multi-volume series, The History of The History of Middle-earth.
17 hours ago
2024-2-27 10:28:52 AM UTC
Ælfwine, you are right, with the definite article missing it could be read as ‘…A Successor Of Christopher Tolkien’, or as ‘…One Of The Successors Of Christopher Tolkien’.

Firstly, what this is for.
Well, there are many books in Russian imitating Tolkien’s works. ‘The Ring of Darkness’ by Nick Perumov (3 titles, about 700,000 copies overall), ‘The Black Book of Arda’ (different editions, more than 37,000 copies overall), ‘Saga about the Hobbit’ (3 titles, 34,000 copies overall), ‘The Bearer of the Ring’ (5 titles, such as ‘The Hobbit and Gandalf’, ‘The Hobbit and Saruman’, ‘The Hobbit and Gollum’, ‘The Hobbit and the One Ring’ etc., 42,000 copies overall), ‘The Red Chronicle of Middle-earth’ (1,000 copies), and more than two dozens others. Such authors as Lord Dunsany or George MacDonald were published in the series with the big letters TOLKIEN and with the small ‘Predecessors’, and the actual last name of an author. Even parodies were published with covers like that: ‘J.R.R. Tolkien. Parodies. [Below] Bored of the Rings’.

Some people share conspiratorial ideas. I’ve met comments that the ‘greedy’ Tolkiens fabricate the posthumous texts. The name of Carl Hostetter was practically unknown for the Russian language readers until ‘The Nature of Middle-earth’. ‘Parma Eldalamberon’ ‘Vinyar Tengwar’ were not published in Russian, and the names of their editors were mostly unknown. Moreover, volumes 6–12 of ‘The History of Middle-earth’ are still unpublished in Russian.

So, the task of the essay was to show that the editor of ‘The Nature of Middle-earth’ was a skilled, widely recognized, respected professional, and a good and honest person (implying: not a random guy hired by the Estate to sell something Tolkienesque).

So, after the introduction (‘The edition was prepared by Carl Hostetter, an experienced publisher of Tolkien's texts, author of numerous articles on Tolkien linguistics, editor of two magazines on this topic: the printed Vinyar Tengwar and the online Tengwestië, one of the key figures of the association of specialists in Elvish languages, The Elvish Linguistic Fellowship’), in the first part of the essay it is told that Carl Hostetter was interested in Tolkien’s works since late 1970-es, worked in fanzines since 1980-es.

Christopher Tolkien started publishing fragments from his father’s linguistic works in ‘The History of Middle-earth’, and in 1992 he personally invited four skilled enthusiasts including Carl Hostetter to continue publishing such works (‘gave a torch’ using the metaphor in the comment). Despite being in different countries, they became friends, Christopher Tolkien sent to Carl Hostetter and his fellow co-editors his father’s texts and approved their publications. He also approved the project of ‘The Nature of the Middle-earth’.

Then, the task to convince the audience that the texts are genuine, not a recent hoax.
The work took 25 years, and it was hard (for example, it was hard to understand Tolkien’s handwriting). Some of the texts had been published by Carl Hostetter in VT, and became well-known, such as ‘Ósanwe-kenta. Some were partially published in ‘Unfinished Tales’, there were some hints on the existence of the others in ‘The History of the Middle-earth’. The essay shows that because of the limitations of space the texts were not included in UT or, say ‘The Peoples of Middle-earth’.

The last part is dedicated to Hostetter’s life, thoughts (on Tolkien’s works) and plans. The author of the essay wanted to give at least a glimpse of his personality, to show the real man behind the words ‘Edited by…’.

The essay is not ideal, I feel it is outdated. Since 2020 when it was firstly written, the world has changed. ‘The Battle of Maldon’, the chronology of The Lord of the Rings and the extended edition of the letters were published. Carl Hostetter will always be the first one to publish Tolkien’s texts after the death of Christopher Tolkien, but he is no longer the only successor, taking into consideration such editors as Brian Sibley. There is a paragraph explaining the original cover art (which is now mostly useless, for the cover has been changed in the Russian edition). Nevertheless, the essay supports the editor of ‘The Nature of Middle-earth’, and I am grateful to Ælfwine for the reaction.
17 hours ago
2024-2-27 10:29:46 AM UTC
Onthetrail, ‘The History of The History of Middle-earth’ is a great idea but I would welcome some primary previously unpublished Tolkien’s texts deciphered by the same editor.
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